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Monday, April 27, 7:00pm - Minneapolis Central Library in Pohlad Hall (300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401)

Talk of the Stacks with Dan Buettner

A National Geographic Fellow and New York Times bestselling author, Dan Buettner is the founder of Blue Zones, a nonprofit dedicated to putting the world’s best practices in longevity and well-being to work in people’s lives. His research on longevity led to a National Geographic cover story, “Secrets of Living Longer,” and two national bestsellers, The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who’ve Lived the Longest and Thrive. A revered public speaker, he has appeared on CNN, the David Letterman Show, Good Morning America and the Today Show to discuss his groundbreaking research. His newest book, The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People, is filled with moving personal stories, recipes and useful tips for a healthier, happier life.

Talk of the Stacks is a reading series exploring contemporary literature and culture. Programs are free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served. Programs begin at 7 pm. Doors open at 6:15 pm. Books are available for sale and signing. Signings follow lectures.

Funding provided by National Endowment for the Arts. In-Kind sponsors: MinnPost and Magers and Quinn Booksellers.

Wednesday, April 29, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Launch Party for Nothing Holy About It: The Zen of Being Just Who You Are by Tim Burkett

Zen teachings—infused with elements of memoir—by a popular modern teacher who "grew up" at the feet of two of the great figures who brought Zen to America, Shunryu Suzuki and Dainin Katagiri. The author employs his reminiscences of those two great masters as teaching anecdotes.

Tim Burkett was twenty when he met Suzuki Roshi, and it was love at first sight. He immediately quit pursuing the career in law to which his illustrious family of jurists inclined him, and became a serious Zen student. He went on to become a licensed psychotherapist and then followed Katagiri Roshi to Minneapolis to become a founder of the Zen scene there. He never left. Now that he's himself a revered Zen teacher, he's decided to articulate his own view of Zen. He structures the teaching according to five not-necessarily sequential levels on the road to enlightenment: (1) commitment to the path, (2) studying the self, (3) cultivating compassion and equanimity, (4) perseverance, and (5) emptiness. This is an introduction to Zen teaching that reads like an intriguing memoir, as the author discovers the teaching in the people, places, and experiences he encounters in the course of his practice.

Thursday, April 30, 7:00pm - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415

The Loft Literary Center presents the 9th Annual "Motherhood & Words" Reading

Local Author Kate Hopper launched the annual Motherhood & Words Reading in 2007.

So often in our society, writing by a group of people is lumped together and dismissed. This has certainly been the case with motherhood literature. In 1976, Adrienne Rich began Of Woman Born with this: “We know more about the air we breathe, the seas we travel, than about the nature and meaning of motherhood.” Almost four decades later, we have made progress, yet motherhood literature is still largely ignored, and motherhood memoir, christened “momoir,” is routinely dismissed.

But like all great writing, literature about motherhood is, as Patricia Hampl says about memoir, “an attempt to find not only a self but a world.” Motherhood literature is not about motherhood; it uses motherhood as a lens through which to see the world.

Join Kate in welcoming authors Kathryn Trueblood and Kao Kalia Yang for the 9th Annual Motherhood & Words Reading on Thursday, April 30 at the Loft.

Kate Hopper is the author of Use Your Words: A Writing Guide for Mothers and Ready for Air: A Journey Through Premature Motherhood, winner of a 2014 MIPA’s Midwest Book Award, and she is co-author of Silent Running, a memoir of one family’s journey with autism and running. Her writing has appeared in a number of journals, including Brevity, the New York Times online, and Poets & Writers. She teaches in Ashland University’s low-residency MFA program, online, and at the Loft Literary Center and Madeline Island School of the Arts.

Kathryn Trueblood’s most recent book is The Baby Lottery, a Book Sense Pick in 2007. She was awarded the 2013 Goldenberg Prize for Fiction, judged by Jane Smiley and sponsored by the Bellevue Literary Review. Trueblood’s latest story, “Diary of a Slut,” was published in 2014 by SheBooks, a new digital publisher of women’s writing. Her stories and articles have been published in Poets & Writers, the Los Angeles Review, Glimmer Train, and others. A professor of English at Western Washington University, she lives in Bellingham, Washington.

Kao Kalia Yang is a teacher, public speaker, and writer. Yang is the author of the award-winning book The Latehomecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir and the forthcoming The Song Poet (Metropolitan Books, 2016). She is a graduate of Carleton College and Columbia University’s School of the Arts. Kao Kalia lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota with her family.

Saturday, May 2, 10:00am - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Independent Bookstore Day!

Join Magers & Quinn Booksellers in celebrating the first National Independent Bookstore Day!

Following the runaway success of last year’s California Bookstore Day, bookstores across the nation are participating in the first National Independent Bookstore Day, featuring lots of fun literary events and exclusive books and merchandise. The first National Independent Bookstore is sponsored in part by Penguin Random House and The American Booksellers Association. See below for Magers & Quinn's full day of literary events!

All Day—Enter our Independent Bookstore Day raffle to win prizes from the Guthrie, Brave New Workshop, advanced copies of books, and more!

10:00am—Coffee and doughnuts sponsored by Bogart’s Doughnut Co.

Bogart's is passionate about fresh and delicious doughnuts. We make traditional flavors with a richer, yeastier egg-and-butter brioche dough.

Bogart's owner Anne Rucker started with a baking-and-blogging hobby that quickly evolved, and in the summer of 2011, her baking passion turned into a doughnut stand at the Kingfield Farmers Market. After three seasons under her belt, she opened the brick-and-mortar shop at 36th and Bryant in May of 2014. She's now a full-time doughnut-maker and small business owner.

12:00pm-1:00pm—Impromptu Poetry with Brett Elizabeth Jenkins

Brett Elizabeth Jenkins writes you a poem. Tell her a secret, and she will write you a poem about it. It doesn't have to be your secret! Spill your mom's beans. Let your grandma's cat out of the bag. Tattle on your ex-landlord. Any way you roll the dice, you come out with a poem!

Brett Elizabeth Jenkins teaches writing and literature in St. Paul. She is the author of the chapbook OH NO EVERYTHING (Pockets Press 2015). Look for her work in Beloit Poetry Journal, PANK, Revolver, Paper Darts, Drunken Boat, Painted Bride Quarterly, and elsewhere.

3:00pm-5:00pm – Obscure Book Recommendations with Rain Taxi Review of Books

Nothing beats having a live bookseller recommend you books (versus an online algorithm!) but even Magers & Quinn booksellers can’t hold a candle to Rain Taxi editor Eric Lorberer when it comes to obscure books that are exactly what you’re looking for. Stop in and chat with him, and leave with the perfect book you never would have picked up (or even heard of) otherwise.

6:00pm-8:00pm – Literary Board Game Night!

Join us for an evening of literary board games - just like game night at home! Come in with your friends, family, and kids and enjoy a game of Bananagrams, Scrabble, Apples to Apples, and more!

We are also teaming up with Nice Ride, Common Good Books, and Moon Palace Books and are giving away FIVE free Nice Ride passes, good for May 2nd only! The passes are available first come, first serve, so arrive early—and spend the rest of your day biking to all the other wonderful indie bookstores in the Cities!

Finally, don't forget to check out our "Customer Picks" display! You faithfully come in and ask for our recommendations, but now it's YOUR turn! Throughout the month of May, we will be featuring a number of books hand-selected by our patrons. Come in and find our what your fellow Magers & Quinn fans are reading!

Sunday, May 3, 6:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Mill City Reading Series

The Mill City Reading Series is a new monthly showcase of works in progress by MFA in Creative Writing students at the University of Minnesota. All are welcome to attend; light refreshments will be provided.

Readers will include:

Fiction writer Mike Alberti
Non-fiction writer Emily Strasser
Poet Anna Rasmussen
Non-fiction writer Veronica Kavass
Poet Trevor Ketner

For more information, please contact D. Allen at millcityreadingseries@gmail.com, or visit their website.

Thursday, May 7, 7:30pm - Hopkins Center for the Arts, 1111 Mainstreet, Hopkins, MN
Pen Pals with Chip Kidd

According to USA Today, Chip Kidd is “the closest thing to a rock star” in the world of graphic design. He is lauded for revolutionizing the book cover and for his iconic illustrations, such as the T-Rex image he designed for Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park. In his role as Associate Art Director at Alfred A. Knopf since 1986, he has produced more than 2,000 iconic designs and has received top honors. His 2012 TED talk has garnered hundreds of thousands of views and was cited as one of the “funniest of the year.” In addition to his design work, Chip Kidd has published two novels and several books on comics and graphic design.

In an illustrated talk, Mr. Kidd will make you reexamine why you judge a book by its cover.

Kidd will also be speaking on Friday, May 8, at 11:00am.

This event is part of the Pen Pals Author Lecture series, a ticketed series benefiting Friends of HCL. The 2014-2015 Pen Pals Season offers five award-winning and engaging presenters who collectively have written, critiqued or created thousands of books: Joyce Carol Oates (with Michael Dirda), Doris Kearns Goodwin, Richard Blanco, Jodi Picoult and Chip Kidd.

Learn more about Pen Pals and purchase a ticket here. Tickets are $40-$50.

Friday, May 8, 7:00pm - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415
The Loft Literary Center presents Michael Dennis Browne, John Hildebrand, and Madelon Sprengnether

John Hildebrand, Madelon Sprengnather, and Michael Dennis Brown launch new works of memoir and poetry.

Michael Dennis Browne's most recent collection of poems, The Voices, was recently published by Carnegie Mellon University Press. Other recent publications include poetry collection Things I Can’t Tell You, and a collection of essays on poetry titled What the Poem Wants. As a librettist, he has written many texts for music, working principally with composer Stephen Paulus, among many others. He is a professor emeritus of English at the University of Minnesota, where he taught for thirty-nine years and was a member of the Academy of Distinguished Teachers.

John Hildebrand is the author of four books, Reading the River, Mapping the Farm, A Northern Front, and most recently The Heart of Things: A Midwestern Almanac. He is the recipient of a Minnesota Book Award, a Banta Award from the Wisconsin Library Association, a Bush Artist Fellowship, and a Wisconsin Arts Board Fellowship. He teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

Madelon Sprengnether is a poet, memoirist and literary critic. She is the author of two books of poetry, The Normal Heart and The Angel of Duluth, two memoirs, Rivers, Stories, Houses, Dreams, and Crying at the Movies, and a co-edited collection of travel essays by women, The House on Via Gombito, in addition to numerous works of literary criticism. She has just published two new books: Great River Road: Memoir and Memory and Near Solstice: Prose Poems.

Tuesday, May 12, 7:00pm - REPUBLIC at Calhoun Square 3001 Hennepin Ave South

Books & Bars discusses We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from National Book Award finalist and Printz Award honoree E. Lockhart.

Read it. And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Wednesday, May 13, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
William D. Green reads from Degrees of Freedom: The Origins of Civil Rights in Minnesota, 1865-1912

The true story, and the black citizens, behind the evolution of racial equality in Minnesota

He had just given a rousing speech to a packed assembly in St. Paul, but Frederick Douglass, confidant to the Great Emancipator and conscience of the Republican Party, was denied a hotel room because he was black. This was Minnesota in 1873, four years after the state had approved black suffrage—a state where “freedom” meant being unshackled from slavery but not social restrictions, where “equality” meant access to the ballot but not to a restaurant downtown.

Spanning the half-century after the Civil War, Degrees of Freedom draws a rare picture of black experience in a northern state and of the nature of black discontent and action within a predominantly white, ostensibly progressive society. William D. Green reveals little-known historical characters among the black men and women who moved to Minnesota following the Fifteenth Amendment; worked as farmhands and laborers; built communities (such as Pig’s Eye Landing, later renamed St. Paul), businesses, and a newspaper (the Western Appeal); and embodied the slow but inexorable advancement of race relations in the state over time. Within this absorbing, often surprising, narrative we meet “ordinary” citizens, like former slave and early settler Jim Thompson and black barbers catering to a white clientele, but also personages of national stature, such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and W. E. B. Du Bois, all of whom championed civil rights in Minnesota. And we see how, in a state where racial prejudice and oppression wore a liberal mask, black settlers and entrepreneurs, politicians, and activists maneuvered within a restricted political arena to bring about real and lasting change.

William D. Green, professor of history at Augsburg College, is the author of A Peculiar Imbalance: The Fall and Rise of Racial Equality in Minnesota.

Friday, May 15, 7:00pm - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415

The Loft Literary Center presents Mentor Series Reading: Dani Shapiro

The 2014–15 Loft Mentor Series in Poetry and Creative Prose presents nonfiction mentor Dani Shapiro reading along with program participants Molly Cooney (nonfiction) and Mary Stein (fiction).

Dani Shapiro is the bestselling author of the memoirs Devotion and Slow Motion, and five novels including Black & White and Family History. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, Granta, Tin House, and more, and has been widely anthologized. She has taught in the writing programs at Columbia, NYU, The New School, and Wesleyan University, and she is co-founder of the Sirenland Writers Conference in Positano, Italy. She is a contributing editor at Travel + Leisure. Her latest book, Still Writing: The Perils and Pleasures of a Creative Life, was published in 2013.

Molly Cooney is a queer writer, mother, and teacher, who spends as much time as possible outdoors. She graduated with her MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Arizona, and her work has appeared in the Gettysburg Review and the North Dakota Quarterly. When she’s not paddling in Arctic rivers or backpacking in the mountains, Molly lives in a century-old house with her partner, one-year-old baby, and four-legged friends.

Mary Stein’s fiction can be found or is forthcoming in Caketrain, the Brooklyn Rail, the Doctor T.J. Eckleburg Review/, and Spartan Lit. Her critical writing can be found online at Numéro Cinq. She received her MFA from the Vermont College of Fine Arts and has been nominated for New Stories from the Midwest. She currently teaches through the Minnesota Prison Writing Workshops and is the assistant editor of Conduit literary magazine.

Monday, May 18, 7:00pm - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415
The Loft Literary Center presents Viet Thanh Nguyen

Viet Thanh Nguyen's The Sympathizer centers on a captain in the South Vietnamese army who relocates to Los Angeles with several of his comrades in 1975. Unbeknownst to his comrades, the captain is reporting on the group’s activities to a superior in the Communist-allied Vietcong. Nguyen weaves details about what it was like to be Vietnamese in America after the war, and the role of Hollywood in shaping national attitudes about conflict, into this spy novel-esque setup.

“Trapped in endless civil war, ‘the man who has two minds’ tortures and is tortured as he tries to meld the halves of his country and of himself. Viet Thanh Nguyen accomplishes this integration in a magnificent feat of storytelling. The Sympathizer is a novel of literary, historical, and political importance.” —Maxine Hong Kingston, author of The Woman Warrior and The Fifth Book of Peace

“Magisterial. A disturbing, fascinating, and darkly comic take on the fall of Saigon and its aftermath and a powerful examination of guilt and betrayal. The Sympathizer is destined to become a classic and redefine the way we think about the Vietnam War and what it means to win and to lose.” —T. C. Boyle

Viet Thanh Nguyen was born in Vietnam and raised in America. His stories have appeared in Best New American Voices, TriQuarterly, Narrative, and the Chicago Tribune. He is the author of the academic book Race and Resistance, and teaches English and American Studies at the University of Southern California.

Suggested ticket price: $5

Tuesday, May 19, 6:15pm - Amsterdam Bar and Hall (6 W. 6th Street, Saint Paul, MN 55102)

Books & Bars discusses We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from National Book Award finalist and Printz Award honoree E. Lockhart.

Read it. And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Wednesday, May 27, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Tom Weber presents 100 Things to Do in the Twin Cities Before You Die

It's hard enough to learn and master one city, but twin cities?

Behold, the essential guide awaits you to achieve the most rewarding bucket list entries for the good people of the Twin Cities. Whether it's strolling the Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis, sipping a drink on the Frost's patio in St. Paul on a warm summer's night, or biking to Stillwater for lunch on the St. Croix River, we've got you covered. We're ready to equip you with outdoor activities that will let you declare victory over the harsh Minnesota winters, but there are also plenty of indoor items for when Jack Frost truly has it in for you. The hearty Minnesotan will know it's a fool's errand to let weather dictate life's pleasures, and a good century of items for all seasons awaits you. Two truly is better than one, and the Twin Cities are waiting to be explored.

Tom Weber is a host for Minnesota Public Radio News. Originally from the Chicago area, he was familiar with cold and winter. But upon moving here at the start of a two-week, below-zero cold snap, Tom quickly embraced all things Minnesota. He lives in St. Paul and generally likes to spend his free time outside (even in the winter) and enjoys biking, hiking, running and cross-country skiing. 100 Things to Do in the Twin Cities Before You Die is his first book.

Thursday, May 28, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Scott Barnett presents Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant

This is the story about how maverick restaurant CEO, Scott Barnett, gambled his reputation on an idea of creating a restaurant chain, Bubba Gump Shrimp Company, out of a single movie.

Written in a cinematic style, Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant is about the creation, growth, and sale of the Bubba Gump Shrimp Company. The concept began when Paramount Pictures reached out to see if there was interest in creating a restaurant based on the movie Forrest Gump. It is also the personal story of the author’s growth as a CEO and creator of restaurant concepts. A host of situations are described such as restaurant concept creation, high stakes boardroom confrontations, and escaping corrupt officials in foreign lands. The narrative is partly an unvarnished peak behind the everyday scenes of restaurants, movie studios, and Wall Street.

Gumption is not only a behind the scenes look at the very unusual world of restaurants, it also tells the inside story of movie studio machinations, corporate politics, and the trials and tribulations of expanding a global business with built-in brand recognition and goodwill.

Scott Barnett is a well-known figure on the US and international restaurant scene. He was President and CEO of Rusty Pelican Restaurants, Inc. from 1992 until 1998, and was Found and CEO of Bubba Gump Shrimp Company Restaurants from its inception. After selling the company in 2011, he worked as Senior Adviser with Pulo Run Capital Partners, an Asia-based Investment Bank and Private Equity firm in Hong Kong. Barnett has actively consulted with a number of restaurant companies world-wide and is a recipient of numerous awards within the hospitality industry. He is a recognized expert on transactions, branding, concept development and overall operations.

Wednesday, June 3, 7:00pm - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415
The Loft Literary Center presents a special reading with Allison Hedge Coke

Please join American Book Award-winning poet, Allison Adelle Hedge Coke for a reading from her latest collection, Streaming, "a veritable symphony, her poems embracing musicality and dissonance like the best of modern composers."

Allison Adelle Hedge Coke is an American Book Award winning poet and the author of Dog Road Woman, Off-Season City Pipe, Blood Run, and Burn, as well as a memoir, Rock, Ghost, Willow, Deer. She is the editor of anthologies Sing: Poetry of Indigenous Americas, Effigies and Effigies II. Currently, she serves as Distinguised Writer at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. Hedge Coke came of age working fields, factories, and waters and is currently at work on a film, Red Dust: Native Resiliency in the Dirty Thirties, chronicling mixed-blood and Native life.

Hedge Coke will be teaching a class at the Loft on June 3rd from 1-4 p.m. called, "The Bird's Nest: Eco Ethos and Organic Form." The class will motivate investigation and subtle application through exploration of some amazing organic poetry structures. Please see the course schedule for further details.

Sunday, June 7, 4:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Maggie Messitt reads from The Rainy Season: Three Lives in the New South Africa

Just across the northern border of a former apartheid-era homeland sits the the remote bushveld community of Rooiboklaagte, caught between a traditional past and a western future, a racially charged history and a pseudo-democratic present. The Rainy Season introduces readers to and opens a window into the complicated reality of daily life in South Africa, telling the stories of three generations in the Rainbow Nation one decade after its first democratic elections. This multi-threaded narrative follows Regina, a tapestry weaver in her sixties, standing at the crossroads where her Catholic faith and the AIDS pandemic crash; Thoko, a middle-aged sangoma (traditional healer) taking steps to turn her shebeen into a fully licensed tavern; and Dankie, a young man taking his matriculation exams, coming of age as one of Mandela’s Children, the first academic class educated entirely under democratic governance.

An independent narrative and immersion journalist, Maggie Messitt has spent the last decade reporting from inside underserved communities in southern Africa and middle America. A dual-citizen, Messitt lived in South Africa from 2003 to 2011. During this time, she was the founding director of a writing school for rural African women, editor of its community newspaper and international literary magazine, and a freelance reporter. Messitt currently resides in Athens, Ohio, where she’s completing her doctorate in creative nonfiction at Ohio University.

---

Advanced Praise for The Rainy Season:

“Whether safari travelogues or tributes to the legacy of Nelson Mandela, what most Americans read about South Africa is far more superficial than Maggie Messitt’s gritty vision of the country. In the tradition of writers like James Agee and Katherine Boo, she has immersed herself deeply in the everyday lives of people struggling with AIDS, early death, corruption, false promises, grinding rural poverty, and the daily struggle to make ends meet in a society that tourists and most foreign correspondents never see. This is a profoundly compassionate book, that truly takes you inside the lives of those in it.” —Adam Hochschild, author pf King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa

The Rainy Season is a delight of closely observed detail from the lives of three memorable characters in a remote South African village. Skillfully taking us through the quiet drama of an unusually generous rainy season in the bushveld, Messitt gives an insight into a world that is key to understanding South Africa today.” —Greg Marinovich, author, The Bang-Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War.

Monday, June 8, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Greg Barnhisel reads from Cold War Modernists: Art, Literature, and American Cultural Diplomacy

American cultural diplomats of the 1940s and 1950s sought to show European intellectuals that the United States had more to offer than military power and commercial exploitation. Through magazines, traveling art exhibits, touring musical shows, radio programs, book translations, and conferences, they deployed the revolutionary aesthetics of modernism to prove—particularly to the leftists whose Cold War loyalties they hoped to secure—that American art and literature were culturally rich and politically significant.

Yet by repurposing modernism, American diplomats and cultural authorities remade the once revolutionary movement into a content-free collection of artistic techniques suitable for middlebrow consumption. They turned the avant-garde into the establishment. Cold War Modernists documents how the CIA, the State Department, and private cultural diplomats transformed modernist art and literature into pro-Western propaganda during the Cold War. Drawing on interviews, previously unknown archival materials, and the stories of such figures and institutions as William Faulkner, Stephen Spender, Irving Kristol, James Laughlin, and the Voice of America, Barnhisel documents how the U.S. government reconfigured modernism as a trans-Atlantic movement, a joint endeavor between American and European artists, with profound implications for the art that followed and the character of American identity in the twentieth century.

Greg Barnhisel teaches in the English department at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His previous books include James Laughlin, New Directions,and the Remaking of Ezra Pound and Pressing the Fight: Print, Propaganda, and the Cold War.

Tuesday, June 9, 7:00pm - REPUBLIC at Calhoun Square 3001 Hennepin Ave South

Books & Bars discusses The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life as she sees it is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Thursday, June 11, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Rebecca Dinerstein reads from The Sunlit Night

From an exhilarating new voice, a stunning debut novel which Jonathan Safran Foer calls as "lyrical as a poem, psychologically rich as a thriller."

In the beautiful, barren landscape of the Far North, under the ever-present midnight sun, Frances and Yasha are surprised to find refuge in each other. Their lives have been upended - Frances has fled heartbreak and claustrophobic Manhattan for an isolated artist colony; Yasha arrives from Brooklyn to fulfill his beloved father's last wish: to be buried "at the top of the world." They have come to learn how to be alone.

But in Lofoten, an archipelago of six tiny islands in the Norwegian Sea, ninety-five miles north of the Arctic Circle, they form a bond that fortifies them against the turmoil of their distant homes, offering solace amidst great uncertainty. With nimble and sure-footed prose, Dinerstein reveals that no matter how far we travel to claim our own territory, it is ultimately love that gives us our place in the world.

Rebecca Dinerstein is the author of Lofoten, a bilingual English-Norwegian collection of poems. She received her B.A. from Yale and her M.F.A. in Fiction from New York University, where she was a Rona Jaffe Graduate Fellow. She lives in Brooklyn.

Sunday, June 14, 2:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

A Talk and Discussion with the Contributors to Class Lives: Stories from across Our Economic Divide

Class Lives is an anthology of narratives dramatizing the lived experience of class in America. It includes forty original essays from authors who represent a range of classes, genders, races, ethnicities, ages, and occupations across the United States. Born into poverty, working class, the middle class, and the owning class—and every place in between—the contributors describe their class journeys in narrative form, recounting one or two key stories that illustrate their growing awareness of class and their place, changing or stable, within the class system.

The stories in Class Lives are both gripping and moving. One contributor grows up in hunger and as an adult becomes an advocate for the poor and homeless. Another acknowledges the truth that her working-class father’s achievements afforded her and the rest of the family access to people with power. A gifted child from a working-class home soon understands that intelligence is a commodity but finds his background incompatible with his aspirations and so attempts to divide his life into separate worlds.

Together, these essays form a powerful narrative about the experience of class and the importance of learning about classism, class cultures, and the intersections of class, race, and gender. Class Lives will be a helpful resource for students, teachers, sociologists, diversity trainers, activists, and a general audience. It will leave readers with an appreciation of the poignancy and power of class and the journeys that Americans grapple with on a daily basis.

Tuesday, June 16, 5:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Launch party for Colin T Nelson's Up Like Thunder

Local suspense author, Colin T. Nelson, is hosting a release party for his new mystery, Up Like Thunder.

When an American woman working in Myanmar disappears, an investigator must go to the country that's been closed to the world for over fifty years. He will travel into the heart of darkness to find and rescue her - if he can manage to survive himself! As one reviewer put it: "Reading this story is like going to Myanmar yourself!"

Colin Nelson has worked as a trial lawyer for almost forty years. His stories out the courtroom are funny and suspenseful. Up Like Thunder is his fifth mystery. He has also had a short story published in a crime anthology called A Festival of Crime. He is married with two adult children and plays the saxophone in a jazz band and a Bob Dylan rock band.

Thursday, June 18, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Lori Horvitz reads from The Girls of Usually with special guest Lee Ann Roripaugh, author of Dandarians

Lori Horvitz grew up ashamed of her Eastern European Jewish roots, confused about her sexuality, and idolizing the "shiksa in her living room," a blonde all-American girl whose photo came in a double frame and was displayed next to a family photo from a bar mitzvah. Unable to join the "happy blonde families," she becomes a "hippie chick" who travels the world in search of … something. The Girls of Usually chronicles each trip, each romance, each experiment in reinventing herself that draws her closer to discovering the secret door through which she can escape from deep-rooted patterns and accept her own cultural, ethnic, and sexual identity.

Lori Horvitz's writing has appeared in a variety of journals and anthologies including South Dakota Review, Southeast Review, Hotel Amerika, and Chattahoochee Review. She has been awarded writing fellowships from Yaddo, Ragdale, Cottages at Hedgebrook, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Blue Mountain Center. A professor of literature and language at UNC Asheville, Horvitz also directs the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program. She received a PhD in English from SUNY at Albany and an MFA in creative writing from Brooklyn College.

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Based on sources as diverse as Heian period female Japanese writers and the world of science fiction, and drawing on her own experience as a second-generation Japanese American, acclaimed poet Lee Ann Roripaugh’s fourth collection Dandarians explores a series of "word betrayals”: English words misunderstood in transmission from her Japanese mother that came to take on symbolic ramifications in her early years. Co-opting and repurposing the language of knowledge and of misunderstanding, and dialoguing in original ways with notions of diaspora and hybrid identities, these poems demonstrate the many ways we attempt to be understood, culminating in an experience of aural awe.

A second-generation Japanese American, Lee Ann Roripaugh writes poetry that deals with themes of culture and identity in all its forms. She has received numerous awards, serves as editor in chief of the "South Dakota Review," and directs the creative writing program at the University of South Dakota. She lives in Vermillion, SD.

Friday, June 19, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Launch of Trans Terra: Towards a Cartoon Philosophy by Tom Kaczynski

Trans Terra is a mutant memoir that melds comics, politics and philosophy into a heady brew exploring work, creativity, emergence of the new, and the possibility of utopia.

The author's journey begins in the frigid wastelands of contemporary consumer culture. Like a surreal HMS Beagle, Trans Terra meanders through time and space exploring archipelagos real and imagined. Prominent stops include Soviet Siberia, Communist Poland, Plato's Atlantis, 19th century New York and Sir Thomas More's Utopia. Arriving on the polluted shores of collapsing global civilization, Tom K glimpses the faint light of utopia beyond the veil of Apocalypse. Taking cue from Salvador Dali's Paranoid Critical-Method the author unearths improbable connections between thinkers as disparate as Ignatious Donnelly, Alvin Toffler, Rem Koolhaas , Slavoj Žižek and many others. Translated into several languages, Trans Terra is a comic-book manifesto for the post-capitalist-crisis world.

Tom Kaczynski is an Eisner- and Ignatz-nominated cartoonist, designer, illustrator, writer, teacher and publisher based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. His comics have appeared in Best American Nonrequired Reading, MOME, Punk Planet, the Drama, and many other publications. As a designer he’s worked on projects for many well-known companies including AOL, Motorola, Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Herman Miller, and for non-profits including IRC (International Rescue Committee). He currently teaches comics at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and occasionally contributes to the Rain Taxi Review of Books.

Sunday, June 21, 3:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Meet Andrew Knapp and Momo, author and star of Find Momo: Coast to Coast

Momo loves to hide—and you’ll love looking for him! In this follow-up to the New York Times bestseller Find Momo, the canine Instagram superstar (and his best buddy, Andrew Knapp) travel across the United States and Canada, visiting iconic landmarks and unique off-the-map marvels. Look for Momo hiding in Grand Central Station, in front of the White House, and in the French Quarter of New Orleans . . . as well as at diners, bookstores, museums, and other locales that only a seasoned road-tripper like Andrew could find. It’s part game, part photography book, and a whole lot of fun.

Andrew Knapp is a freelance interface designer and photographer from northern Ontario who desires to make everyday routines into creative adventures. Along with his commercial photography and design work, he’s filmed a TEDx Talk, collaborated on an Instamissions project with MTV and Sony, and cofounded the We Live Up Here collaboration exploring life in Sudbury, Ontario.

Momo is an adorable brown-eyed border collie, Andrew’s BFF, and a genius at hiding. He has over 301,000 Instagram fans.

Tuesday, June 23, 6:15pm - Amsterdam Bar and Hall (6 W. 6th Street, Saint Paul, MN 55102)
Books & Bars discusses The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life as she sees it is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Monday, July 27, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Cynthia Swanson reads from The Bookseller

A provocative and hauntingly powerful debut novel reminiscent of Sliding Doors, The Bookseller follows a woman in the 1960s who must reconcile her reality with the tantalizing alternate world of her dreams.

Nothing is as permanent as it appears . . .

Denver, 1962: Kitty Miller has come to terms with her unconventional single life. She loves the bookshop she runs with her best friend, Frieda, and enjoys complete control over her day-to-day existence. She can come and go as she pleases, answering to no one. There was a man once, a doctor named Kevin, but it didn’t quite work out the way Kitty had hoped.

Then the dreams begin.

Denver, 1963: Katharyn Andersson is married to Lars, the love of her life. They have beautiful children, an elegant home, and good friends. It’s everything Kitty Miller once believed she wanted—but it only exists when she sleeps.

Convinced that these dreams are simply due to her overactive imagination, Kitty enjoys her nighttime forays into this alternate world. But with each visit, the more irresistibly real Katharyn’s life becomes. Can she choose which life she wants? If so, what is the cost of staying Kitty, or becoming Katharyn?

As the lines between her worlds begin to blur, Kitty must figure out what is real and what is imagined. And how do we know where that boundary lies in our own lives?

Cynthia Swanson is a writer and mid-century modern designer. She has published short fiction in 13th Moon, Kalliope, Sojourner, and other periodicals; her story in 13th Moon was a Pushcart Prize nominee. She lives in Denver, Colorado, with her husband and three children. The Bookseller is her first novel.

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