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Magers and Quinn Event Information
 
Thursday, January 29, 5:30pm - The Minneapolis Club (729 Second Avenue South, Minneapolis)
“Tipped in”: A Literature Lovers event featuring a selection of authors and publishers

Partnering with Magers & Quinn Booksellers, this event will be an opportunity to mingle with several authors and publisher’s representatives, ask questions, and get books signed.

Writers will talk about their current and forthcoming work, the publishers will talk about what is hot off the press and raffle some pre-publication copies of books, and everyone shares some fun insider info so the audience really feels like they are “Tipped In” to special knowledge. Authors William Kent Krueger, Jonathan Odell, Lorna Landvik, and Scott Dominic Carpenter will all be speaking. Matt Smiley from the Univ. of MN Press and Jason Gobble from Penguin Random House will also be in attendance with new releases.

Happy Hour/Cash Bar – Guests welcome

$16.95++ members/$26 inclusive guests

Purchase ticketshere.

Monday, February 9, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Michael Bazzett presents You Must Remember This with Jamaal May, author of Hum

Michael Bazzett is the recipient of the 2014 Lindquist & Vennum Prize for Poetry, winning a contract with Milkweed Editions to publish his forthcoming collection, You Must Remember This. A graduate of Carleton College who currently teaches at the Blake School, Mr. Bazzett is the author of The Unspoken Jokebook and the acclaimed chapbook The Imaginary City.

Prize judge Kevin Prufer called You Must Remember This “a book of unnerving wonders, one in which improbable events are narrated with strange intimacy, lucidity, and sly wit.”

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In Jamaal May's debut collection, the human body is machine, manufactured in the motor city, alive with the urban sounds and beats. Poems buzz and purr like well-oiled chassis. Grit and trial and song thrum through each line. Tight syntax, finely tuned internal rhyme, and punchy consonants percuss each poem's beat like an unfailing 808 drum.

Jamaal May was raised by two auto workers in Detroit, Michigan, where he eventually taught poetry in public schools. After making a living as a self-taught poet and musician, Jamaal went on to publish two chapbooks, earn an MFA from Warren Wilson, and be featured in Callaloo, Indiana Review, Blackbird, and Michigan Quarterly Review, among other journals, films, and broadcasts. He's the recipient of fellowships from Cave Canem, Callaloo, and Bucknell University, where he was named the 2011-2013 Stadler Fellow.

Tuesday, February 10, 7:00pm - REPUBLIC at Calhoun Square 3001 Hennepin Ave South
Books & Bars presents The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

In The Golem and the Jinni, a chance meeting between mythical beings takes readers on a dazzling journey through cultures in turn-of-the-century New York.

Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life to by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic and dies at sea on the voyage from Poland. Chava is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York harbor in 1899.

Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire born in the ancient Syrian desert, trapped in an old copper flask, and released in New York City, though still not entirely free

Ahmad and Chava become unlikely friends and soul mates with a mystical connection. Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker's debut novelThe Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Wednesday, February 11, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Peter Heller presents The Painter

Two years ago, Peter Heller’s debut novel was a breakout bestseller. Topping Best Books of the Year lists from Atlantic Monthly, San Francisco Examiner, and Hudson Booksellers, The Dog Stars was critically celebrated and published in eighteen languages.

Heller’s second novel The Painter is a handsome, savage story pairing art and angst, love and lust, grief and—ultimately—healing. A certain fierceness informs Jim Stegner, an expressionist artist who paints and fly fishes with similar abandon, finding comfort and inspiration in nature, while struggling to transcend the violent nature of man.

From the outset, Stegner takes us along for a wild ride. Serene moments spent fishing mountain streams of the American West, our only respite. And it’s these lyrical descriptions that put The Painter in rare company with some of the finest fly-fishing prose ever written.

With the elements of mystery, adventure, and man’s internal struggles perfectly balanced, Heller carries us along at a breakneck pace, intersecting action and luscious descriptions of Stegner as he paints, and fishes, and learns to create a meaningful life.

Peter Heller is a longtime contributor to NPR, and a contributing editor at Outside Magazine, Men’s Journal, and National Geographic Adventure. He is an award winning adventure writer and the author of four books of literary nonfiction, and two novels. He lives in Denver.

Tuesday, February 17, 6:15pm - The Happy Gnome (498 Selby Ave, St Paul, MN 55102)
Books & Bars presents The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

In The Golem and the Jinni, a chance meeting between mythical beings takes readers on a dazzling journey through cultures in turn-of-the-century New York.

Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life to by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic and dies at sea on the voyage from Poland. Chava is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York harbor in 1899.

Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire born in the ancient Syrian desert, trapped in an old copper flask, and released in New York City, though still not entirely free

Ahmad and Chava become unlikely friends and soul mates with a mystical connection. Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker's debut novelThe Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Wednesday, February 18, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

David Treuer presents Prudence

In his newest novel, Prudence, David Treuer pushes the boundaries of identity, crossing boundaries of race, gender, and sexual orientation to tell a haunting story of love, loss, and desire in World War II-era America.

In the vein of classics like Atonement and The English Patient, Prudence centers on an illicit love affair and the shattering consequences that will reverberate years into the future for its cast of deeply original, deeply sympathetic, and beautifully realized male and female characters. Both ambitious and accessible, Prudence is about the secrets we choose to keep, the ones we can’t help but tell, and who—and how—we’re allowed to love. Having already earned rare praise from Toni Morrison, Prudence is a landmark novel that reaffirms David Treuer as “truly an original voice” (The San Francisco Chronicle) and cements his place as a significant voice in American fiction.

David Treuer is Ojibwe from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. He grew up on Leech Lake and left to attend Princeton University where he worked with Paul Muldoon, Joanna Scott, and Toni Morrison. He published his first novel, Little, when he was twenty-four. Treuer is the recipient of the Pushcart Prize, and his work has been named an editor's pick by the Washington Post, Time Out, and City Pages. His essays and reviews have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Esquire, Slate.com, and the Washington Post. He has a PhD in anthropology and teaches literature and creative writing at The University of Southern California. He divides his time between LA and The Leech Lake Reservation.

Thursday, February 19, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Mizna: Prose, Poetry and Art Exploring Arab America Volume 15 release party

Please join us in celebrating two fabulous issues of Mizna: Prose, Poetry and Art Exploring Arab America. Volume 15, Issue 1—"Eating the Other," focusing on the politics of food; and Volume 15, Issue 2—a selection of thought-provoking proceedings from the recent Radius of Arab American Writers + Mizna Writers Conference, held at Open Book in September 2014.

"Mizna is an organization devoted to promoting Arab-American culture, providing a forum for its expression. We value diversity in our community and are committed to giving voice to Arab Americans through literature and art."

Live readings, food and drink. This event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, February 19, 7:00pm - Minneapolis Central Library in Pohlad Hall (300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401)

Talk of the Stacks with Boris Fishman

Boris Fishman was born in the Soviet Union and immigrated to the United States in 1980 at the age of nine. An accomplished journalist with a bachelor’s in Russian Literature from Princeton and a master’s in Fiction from New York University, his writing has appeared in the New Yorker, New Republic, Wall Street Journal, and London Review of Books. His debut novel, A Replacement Life, has garnered praise from the literary world and was selected as one of the New York Times’ 100 Notable Books for 2014. This thoughtful and sometimes humorous novel about family and justice tells the story of a frustrated journalist who sets out to forge Holocaust-restitution claims for elderly Russian Jews in New York.

Talk of the Stacks is a reading series exploring contemporary literature and culture. Programs are free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served. Programs begin at 7 pm. Doors open at 6:15 pm. Books are available for sale and signing. Signings follow lectures.

Funding provided by National Endowment for the Arts. In-Kind sponsors: MinnPost and Magers and Quinn Booksellers.

Friday, February 20, 7:00pm - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415
The Loft Literary Center presents Mentor Series Reading: Matt Rasmussen

The 2014–15 Loft Mentor Series in Poetry and Creative Prose presents poetry mentor Matt Rasmussen reading along with program participants Karlyn Coleman (fiction) and Jennifer Krueger (nonfiction).

Matt Rasmussen’s poetry has been published in Gulf Coast, Cimarron Review, H_NGM_N, Water~Stone Review, New York Quarterly, Paper Darts, and at Poets.org. He’s received awards, grants, and residencies from The Bush Foundation, The McKnight Foundation, The Minnesota State Arts Board, Jerome Foundation, Intermedia Arts, The Anderson Center in Red Wing, MN, and The Corporation of Yaddo. He is a 2014 Pushcart Prize winner, a former Peace Corps Volunteer, and teaches at Gustavus Adolphus College. His first book of poems, Black Aperture, won the 2012 Walt Whitman Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award in 2013.

Karlyn Coleman was recently awarded a Minnesota Emerging Writers’ Grant. Her stories have been published in Paper Darts, McSweeney’s, Canvas, and Revolver. Her story “Ice Roads” was awarded first place in fiction and is forthcoming in Crab Orchard Review. She lives in South Minneapolis with her husband, two boys, and a dog named Happy.

Jennifer Krueger is a freelance writer living in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her work has appeared in Revolver, The Evening Street Review, Front Porch Journal, and elsewhere. She has also published over one dozen nonfiction books for children under a pseudonym. She is a stay-at-home mom who has taken classes at The Loft Literary Center for the past four years.

Monday, February 23, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Karen Babine reads from Water and What We Know: Following the Roots of a Northern Life

Consider your place, the place where you feel the most at home: a tree-lined lake, a bean field planted on historical land, a rig drilling the golden prairie, city streets alive with energy. Written in the language of the northern landscape of experience, Karen Babine explores the meaning of being in your place on a particular day.

In essays that travel from the wildness of Lake Superior to the order of an apple orchard, Babine traces an ethic of place, a way to understand the essence of inhabiting a place deeply rooted in personal stories. She takes us from moments of reflection, through the pages of her Minnesota family’s history, to the drama of the land and the shaping of the earth. How, she asks, does land determine what kind of people grow in that soil? And through it all runs water, carrying a birch bark canoe with a bullet hole and a bloodstain, roaring over the Edmund Fitzgerald, flooding the Red River Valley, carving the glaciated land along with historical memory.

As she searches out the stories that water has written on human consciousness, Babine reveals again and again what their poignancy tells us about our place and what it means to be here.

Karen Babine is assistant professor of English at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. Her essays have appeared in River Teeth, Sycamore Review, North Dakota Quarterly, Ascent, and elsewhere. She is the editor of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies.

Tuesday, February 24, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Nickolas Butler presents Shotgun Lovesongs

Welcome to Little Wing. It’s a place like hundreds of others, nothing special, really. But for four friends—all born and raised in this small Wisconsin town—it is home. And now they are men, coming into their own or struggling to do so.

One of them never left, still working the family farm that has been tilled for generations. But others felt the need to move on, with varying degrees of success. One trades commodities, another took to the rodeo circuit, and one of them even hit it big as a rock star. And then there’s Beth, a woman who has meant something special in each of their lives.

Now all four are brought together for a wedding. Little Wing seems even smaller than before. While lifelong bonds are still strong, there are stresses—among the friends, between husbands and wives. There will be heartbreak, but there will also be hope, healing, even heroism as these memorable people learn the true meaning of adult friendship and love.

Seldom has the American heartland been so richly and accurately portrayed. Though the town may have changed, the one thing that hasn’t is the beauty of the Wisconsin farmland, the lure of which, in Nickolas Butler’s hands, emerges as a vibrant character in the story. Shotgun Lovesongs is that rare work of fiction that evokes a specific time and place yet movingly describes the universal human condition. It is, in short, a truly remarkable book—a novel that once read will never be forgotten.

NICKOLAS BUTLER was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and raised in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. His writings have appeared in: Narrative Magazine, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review Online, The Progressive, The Christian Science Monitor, and elsewhere. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin and the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, he currently lives in Wisconsin with his wife and their two children.

Friday, February 27, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

A Reading with the Contributors to A Wizard of Their Age: Critical Essays from the Harry Potter Generation

A Wizard of Their Age began when the students in Cecilia Konchar Farr’s “Six Degrees of Harry Potter” course at St. Catherine University kept finding errors in the available scholarship. These students had been reading Harry Potter for their entire literate lives, and they demanded more attention to the details they found significant. “We can do better than this,” they said.

Konchar Farr, two undergraduate teaching assistants, and five student editors decided to test that hypothesis. After issuing a call for contributions, they selected fifteen thoughtful academic essays by students from across the country. These essays examine the Harry Potter books from a variety of perspectives, including literary, historical, cultural, gender, mythological, psychological, theological, and genetic—there is even a nursing care plan for Tom Riddle. Interspersed among the essays are brief vignettes entitled “My Harry Potter Story,” where students write about their personal encounters with the novels.

Although a quick Internet search yields a dazzling number of books about Harry Potter, few are as deeply invested or insightful as A Wizard of Their Age. Written and edited by—and for—members of the Harry Potter generation, these essays demonstrate this generation’s passionate engagement with the Harry Potter phenomenon and provide numerous critical insights into the individual novels and the series as a whole.

Cecilia Konchar Farr is Professor of English and Women’s Studies at St. Catherine University. She is the author of Reading Oprah: How Oprah’s Book Club Changed the Way America Reads and the coeditor (with Jaime Harker) of The Oprah Affect: Critical Essays on Oprah’s Book Club, both published by SUNY Press.

Monday, March 9, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Reif Larsen reads from I Am Radar

The moment just before Radar Radmanovic is born, all of the hospital’s electricity mysteriously fails. The delivery takes place in total darkness. Lights back on, the staff sees a healthy baby boywith pitch-black skinborn to the stunned white parents. No one understands the uncanny electrical event or the unexpected skin color.

A kaleidoscopic novel both heartbreaking and dazzling, Reif Larsen’s I Am Radar begins with Radar’s perplexing birth but rapidly explodes outward, carrying readers across the globe and throughout history, as well as to unknown regions where radio waves and subatomic particles dance to their own design. Spanning this extraordinary range with grace and empathy, humor and courage,I Am Radar is the vessel where a century of conflict and art unite in a mesmerizing narrative whole.

Drawing on the furthest reaches of quantum physics, forgotten history, and mind-bending art, Larsen’s I Am Radar is a triumph of storytelling at its most primal, elegant, and epic: a breathtaking journey through humanity’s darkest hours only to arrive at a place of shocking wonder and redemption.

Reif Larsen’s first novel, The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet, was a New York Times bestseller and has been translated into twenty-seven languages. A Montana Honor book, The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet was a finalist for the IndieBound Award, was short-listed for the Guardian First Book Award and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and is currently being released as a film in France and the United States.

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Praise for I Am Radar:

“Gripping…Masterly...This is a sprawling, engrossing novel about the ravages of war and the triumph of art. Larsen is an effortless magician, and his performance here is a pure delight.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Strange things happen when Radar Radmanovic is around… If Larsen’s story makes demands of its readers, it also offers plenty of rewards. Imaginative, original, nicely surreal.” —Kirkus

“This book is a huge departure from T.S. Spivet. It’s sprawling and ambitious, beautiful and strange. I’ve just put it down, and I’m feeling a bit dazed and confused. I can’t help but be reminded of the feeling I’m left with after finishing a Haruki Murakami novel.” —Emily Adams, Third Place Books (Seattle, WA)

Tuesday, March 10, 7:00pm - REPUBLIC at Calhoun Square 3001 Hennepin Ave South

Books & Bars discusses Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler

Welcome to Little Wing. It’s a place like hundreds of others, nothing special, really. But for four friends—all born and raised in this small Wisconsin town—it is home. And now they are men, coming into their own or struggling to do so.

Now all four are brought together for a wedding. Little Wing seems even smaller than before. While lifelong bonds are still strong, there are stresses—among the friends, between husbands and wives. There will be heartbreak, but there will also be hope, healing, even heroism as these memorable people learn the true meaning of adult friendship and love.

Seldom has the American heartland been so richly and accurately portrayed. Though the town may have changed, the one thing that hasn’t is the beauty of the Wisconsin farmland, the lure of which, in Nickolas Butler’s hands, emerges as a vibrant character in the story. Shotgun Lovesongs is that rare work of fiction that evokes a specific time and place yet movingly describes the universal human condition. It is, in short, a truly remarkable book—a novel that once read will never be forgotten.

NICKOLAS BUTLER was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and raised in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. His writings have appeared in: Narrative Magazine, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review Online, The Progressive, The Christian Science Monitor, and elsewhere. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin and the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, he currently lives in Wisconsin with his wife and their two children.

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Thursday, March 12, 7:30pm - Hopkins Center for the Arts, 1111 Mainstreet, Hopkins, MN
Pen Pals with Richard Blanco

In 2013, award-winning poet Richard Blanco became the first Latino immigrant and openly gay writer to serve as the fifth inaugural poet of the United States, following in the footsteps of Robert Frost and Maya Angelou. In that same year, he was asked to create a poem reflecting on the Boston Marathon bombing victims for a benefit concert. He was born in Madrid in 1968 to Cuban exiles and shortly after immigrated to the United States. His poetry collections include City of a Hundred Fires, Directions to the Beach of the Dead and Looking for the Gulf Motel. His highly-anticipated memoir, Los Cucuyos: A Miami Childhood, was published in fall 2014.

In an inspiring presentation of prose and poetry, Mr. Blanco will share his life story, creative inspirations and poetic works.

Blanco will also be speaking on Friday, March 13, at 11:00am.

This event is part of the Pen Pals Author Lecture series, a ticketed series benefiting Friends of HCL. The 2014-2015 Pen Pals Season offers five award-winning and engaging presenters who collectively have written, critiqued or created thousands of books: Joyce Carol Oates (with Michael Dirda), Doris Kearns Goodwin, Richard Blanco, Jodi Picoult and Chip Kidd.

Learn more about Pen Pals and purchase a ticket here. Tickets are $40-$50.

Friday, March 13, 12:00am - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415

The Loft Literary Center presents Mentor Series Reading: Kao Kalia Yang

The 2014–15 Loft Mentor Series in Poetry and Creative Prose presents nonfiction mentor Kao Kalia Yang reading along with program participants Rhea Davison-Edwards (poetry) and Kinzy Janssen (nonfiction).

Kao Kalia Yang, author of The Latehomecomer, is the co-founder of a company dedicated to helping immigrants with writing, translating, and business services. Yang is a graduate of Carleton College and Columbia University. She is currently working on her second manuscript, Still, Fluttering Heart: The Second Album. Based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Kao Kalia Yang is a teacher, public speaker, and writer.

Rhea Davison-Edwards has a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Minnesota and an MFA from Minnesota State University-Mankato. In her writing, she seeks to write honestly and openly about real-life struggles, while also creating and sustaining hope. She has primarily worked in nonfiction and fiction, but she’s thrilled to have the opportunity to focus on the art and craft of poetry, with the help of great mentors and the company of fellow mentees.

Kinzy Janssen is an editor, blogger, and poet living in Saint Paul whose work has been published in Wisconsin People & Ideas, Volume One, and Innisfree Poetry Journal. She is currently social media editor at The Riveter Magazine. She’s always in the mood for karaoke and craft beer, and fancies herself a gardener after one semi-successful year. She loves musing about the Midwest and its boundaries, regionalisms, and weather.

Tuesday, March 17, 6:15pm - The Happy Gnome (498 Selby Ave, St Paul, MN 55102)
Books & Bars discusses Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler

Welcome to Little Wing. It’s a place like hundreds of others, nothing special, really. But for four friends—all born and raised in this small Wisconsin town—it is home. And now they are men, coming into their own or struggling to do so.

Now all four are brought together for a wedding. Little Wing seems even smaller than before. While lifelong bonds are still strong, there are stresses—among the friends, between husbands and wives. There will be heartbreak, but there will also be hope, healing, even heroism as these memorable people learn the true meaning of adult friendship and love.

Seldom has the American heartland been so richly and accurately portrayed. Though the town may have changed, the one thing that hasn’t is the beauty of the Wisconsin farmland, the lure of which, in Nickolas Butler’s hands, emerges as a vibrant character in the story. Shotgun Lovesongs is that rare work of fiction that evokes a specific time and place yet movingly describes the universal human condition. It is, in short, a truly remarkable book—a novel that once read will never be forgotten.

NICKOLAS BUTLER was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and raised in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. His writings have appeared in: Narrative Magazine, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review Online, The Progressive, The Christian Science Monitor, and elsewhere. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin and the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, he currently lives in Wisconsin with his wife and their two children.

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Thursday, March 19, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Amy Scheibe reads from A Fireproof Home for the Bride

Emmaline Nelson and her sister Birdie grow up in the hard, cold, rural Lutheran world of strict parents, strict milking times, and strict morals. Marriage is preordained and though it’s 1958, southern Minnesota did not see changing roles for women on the horizon.

Caught in a time bubble between a world war and the ferment of the 1960’s, Emmy doesn’t question the path laid before her. Only when her fiancé shows his true colors and forces himself upon her does she find the courage to act. Readers will cheer for Emmy as she discovers her voice, moves from the farm to town, breaks her engagement, and finds a job as a switch board operator at the local newspaper, The Fargo Forum. She even falls for an absolutely forbidden suitor—a Catholic boy. Emmy quickly takes to the newsroom and hopes to break out as a reporter. Following her gut and inquisitive instincts, she discovers that the KKK is not only active in the Midwest, but that her family is involved. Her sense of the firm rules she grew up under—and their effect—begins to change completely.

Amy Scheibe lives in Manhattan with her husband and two children. Her first novel, What Do You Do All Day, was Amazon.com’s #1 Women’s Fiction Pick for 2005.

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Praise for A Fireproof Home for the Bride:

“An engrossing tale of intrigue, deceit and racial unrest in the upper Midwest in the 1950s, A Fireproof Home for the Bride is a fresh take on a pivotal moment in American history.” —Christina Baker Kline, #1 bestselling author of Orphan Train

A Fireproof Home for the Bride fascinates with its postwar period detail, and bravely travels to corners of the heartland where everyone has secrets, and wholesomeness is not as it appears.” —Kate Manning, author of My Notorious Life

A Fireproof Home for the Bride is an engrossing, quietly profound story of a young woman’s coming of age in the deceptively bucolic Upper Midwest of the 1950s. Its nuanced, utterly real characters and tantalizing revelation of secrets will keep readers turning the pages.” —Jennifer Chiaverini, author of Mrs. Lincoln’s Dressmaker

Tuesday, March 24, 7:00pm - On Being with Krista Tippett (1619 Hennepin Ave S, Minneapolis)
Launch party for Tony Jones' Did God Kill Jesus?: Searching for Love in History's Most Famous Execution

The church has a problem with the cross. What was supposed to be a potent symbol of God’s love has become an instrument for making Christians feel guilty and ashamed, even unlovable—the very things the cross was meant to remedy. In Did God Kill Jesus? popular theologian, blogger, speaker, and author Tony Jones invites us to explore how the church lost its way, showing us how we can restore the cross to its rightful place at the center of Christian faith as an inspiring message of how much God loves us and as an inspiration to love others.

Tony Jones (M.Div., Ph.D.) is a theologian, professor, and writer. Currently, he serves as theologian-in-residence at Solomon's Porch in Minneapolis, and teaches at Fuller Theological Seminary and United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. Tony has written a dozen books on Christian ministry, spirituality, prayer, and new church movements. He lives in Minnesota with his wife, kids, and dogs.

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Praise for Did God Kill Jesus?:

“This important, smart, readable, and ultimately beautiful book allows this generation to re-claim the cross as the place of God’s deepest love rather than the place of our deepest shame. Jones unlocks the chains of fear and shame that bind so much of Christianity and offers us instead, freedom. I am so grateful for this important book. I will honestly be referring people to Did God Kill Jesus? for decades to come. It’s that important. If I had this book in seminary, several of my classes would have made a lot more sense.” —Nadia Bolz-Weber, author of Pastrix and pastor of House for All Sinners and Saints

“Engaging and accessible, written with the right mix of humility and conviction, Did God Kill Jesus? invites readers to wrestle with key questions about Christianity. I learned something new on every page and will be thinking about this one for a long, long time.” —Rachel Held Evans, author of A Year of Biblical Womanhood and Searching for Sunday

Did God Kill Jesus? is the one and only book I have ever seen on the atonement that I can wholeheartedly recommend without reservation and with devout enthusiasm. Even-handed, historically complete, accessible to any reader who chooses to approach it, this is a masterful piece of work.” —Phyllis Tickle, author of The Great Emergence

Wednesday, March 25, 7:00pm - Minneapolis Central Library in Pohlad Hall (300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401)

Talk of the Stacks with Lisa See

New York Times bestselling author of Dreams of Joy, Shanghai Girls, Peony in Love and Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, Lisa See has been writing about the Asian-American experience for twenty years. Informed by her own family’s experiences, Ms. See’s critically-acclaimed works illuminate forgotten stories and highlight the strong bonds between women and love of country. Her newest novel China Dolls, named one of the “Best Books of 2014” by the Washington Post, follows the intertwined lives of three Asian-American nightclub performers in San Francisco during the 1930s and 1940s.

Talk of the Stacks is a reading series exploring contemporary literature and culture. Programs are free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served. Programs begin at 7 pm. Doors open at 6:15 pm. Books are available for sale and signing. Signings follow lectures.

Funding provided by National Endowment for the Arts. In-Kind sponsors: MinnPost and Magers and Quinn Booksellers.

Wednesday, April 8, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
BOMB Magazine and Two Dollar Radio present Sarah Gerard, Ian Dreiblatt, Nicholas Rombes, and Rae Armantrout

Join BOMB Magazine and Two Dollar Radio for a reading with Sarah Gerard, Ian Dreiblatt, Nicholas Rombes, and Rae Armantrout

Sarah Gerard is the author of the chapbook Things I Told My Mother and the novel Binary Star. Short works have appeared in The New York Times, Bookforum, The Paris Review Daily, Joyland, The Los Angeles Review of Books and other journals. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, and works at BOMB Magazine.

Ian Dreiblatt is a poet, translator, critic, and musician who lives in Brooklyn. His recent translations include Gogol's The Nose, Comradely Greetings (the prison correspondence of Pussy Riot's Nadyezhda Tolokonnikova with philosopher Slavoj Žižek), and various writing by insurgent artists of the Russian and Ukrainian left. sonnets, a chapbook, was published in 2014 by Metambesen, and letterpress-printed chap, בראשונה, is forthcoming in spring 2015 from DoubleCross Press. Work has additionally appeared in journals including Bomb, Web Conjunctions, The Agriculture Reader, Elderly, and Sink Review. In his spare time, he devises desolate walking tours of New York City, an obscure human settlement on the edge of America.

Nicholas Rombes is author of the novel The Absolution of Roberto Acestes Laing (Two Dollar Radio, October 2014) as well as Ramones from the acclaimed 33 1/3 series published by Bloomsbury. He is a contributing editor at Filmmaker Magazine and has written for The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Believer, The Rumpus, n+1, and other places. He is a professor of English at the University of Detroit Mercy in Detroit, Michigan.

Rae Armantrout is a professor of writing in the Literature Department at the University of California at San Diego, and the author of eleven books of poetry, including Money Shot, Versed, Next Life, and Veil: New and Selected Poems.

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BOMB Magazine has been publishing conversations between artists of all disciplines since 1981. BOMB's founders—New York City based artists and writers—created BOMB because they saw a disparity between the way artists talked about their work among themselves and the way critics described it.

Today, BOMB is a multi-media publishing house that creates, disseminates, and preserves artist-generated content from interviews to artists’ essays to new literature. BOMB includes a quarterly print magazine, a daily online publication, and a digital archive of its previously published content from 1981 onward.

Two Dollar Radio was founded in 2005. The original impetus came on the heels of reading Andre Schiffrin’s The Business of Books. Two Dollar Radio functions on a no-wasted bullets policy. You won’t find jokebooks or bathroom readers camouflaged in our lists. Our primary interest lies with what we would characterize as bold work: subversive, original, and highly creative.

Two Dollar Radio-published books have been honored by the National Book Foundation, finalists for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, picked as 'Editors' Choice' selections by The New York Times Book Review, and made year-end best-of lists at O, The Oprah Magazine, National Public Radio, Time Out New York, Slate, Salon, and The Believer.

Thursday, April 9, 7:30pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Launch of ELJ's Wild and Harvest editions

SUNY-Buffalo State's literary journal, ELJ (Elm Leaves Journal) celebrates the launch of its Wild and Harvest editions, with readings by:

Kim Chinquee
Paul Lisicky
Gregory Lawless
Robert Lopez
Ted Pelton
Trevor Dodge
Kathy Fish
Peter Ramos.

Elm Leaves Journal is Buffalo State's historic literary and arts journal. In production since 1948, Elm Leaves Journal has been administered, edited and produced by students at Buffalo State College.

In 2013, after a brief hiatus, Elm Leaves Journal was re-imagined as ELJ, a cutting edge, national literary journal. The 2013 edition was the first that published writers outside of the Buffalo State community, that was printed by a professional publisher. ELJ is published through the cooperation of the Writing Major and the School of Arts and Humanities.

The Wild Edition (Winter 2013) features work by writers Matthew Bookin, Eric Bosse, Tiff Holland, Gergory Lawless, Paul Lisicky, Robert Lopez, Mary Miller, Darlin' Neal, Ted Pelton, Gary Percesepe, Jennifer Pieroni, Matthew Roberston, Gail Louise Siegel, Curtis Smith, Ed Taylor, Griija Tropp, and Amy Day Wilkinson.

The Harvest edition (Fall 2014) features work by Trevor Dodge, Kathy Fish, Zach Fishel, Sherrie Flick, Lydia Copeland Gwyn, Tiff Holland, Paul Myette, Thomas O’Connell, Peter Ramos, Gail Louise Siegel, Kaysi Stepien, Ed Taylor, Diane Vickers, and Joan Wilking.

The Dirt edition is scheduled to be released in the academic year of 2015-2016. Submissions of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, book reviews and translations (of any word length) can be sent in the body of the email to eljbuffalo@gmail.com.

The journal is edited by Pushcart Prize-winning author Kim Chinquee, Associate Professor of English, and co-director of the writing major. ELJ is produced, in part, through the work of students in ENG 357, Literary Publishing. In this course, Professor Chinquee takes the students through the process or producing the journal, from layout to selection to editing.

Friday, April 10, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)
Algonquin Roundtable featuring Algonquin authors Tim Johnston, Jill McCorkle, Bill Roorbach, and more

Join us for a special Algonquin Roundtable featuring the following Algonquin authors:

Tim Johnston, author of debut novel Descent
Jill McCorkle, Life After Life
Bill Roorbach, Life Among Giants, The Remedy for Love
Brock Clarke, An Arsonist's Guide to Writers Homes in New England, The Happiest People in the World
Lauren Grodstein, A Friend of the Family, An Explanation for Everything
Gina Frangello, A Life in Men
Michael Parker, All I Have in This World, The Watery Part of the World

The authors will read and do a question and answer session. This event is free and open to the public.

Algonquin Books' founding edict still holds strong: to publish quality fiction and nonfiction by undiscovered young writers, and to keep our books in print, reaching new fans for years to come. Though they publish only 20 new titles a year, we are recognized around the world as an award-winning literary house with numerous bestsellers. From Water for Elephants to A Reliable Wife, The Art Forger to Last Child in the Woods, our books continue to stimulate, enrich and entertain legions of fans.

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The above authors will also be participating in an panel at the Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) Conference, titled "Between Oblivion and The Blockbuster: What's a Literary Novel To Do?" This event is only open to those registered for the conference.

At a time when the literary novel seems all but doomed, five accomplished authors have found safe haven with an indie house that publishes just 20 new titles a year. Now, at vastly different moments in their careers-some quite impressively along, others just debuting-these Algonquin Books authors gather to tell stories of the paths that led each of them to this common publishing experience, and to discuss what they've learned about a literary landscape that might not be so bleak after all.

This panel spotlights a paradigm that many believe to be a relic of the publishing past: the literary author as the house's most valued-and most well-supported-commodity. The panelists hail from a wide diversity of backgrounds and publishing histories, yet all share this unique and critical career experience. The stories of their journeys will interest, and perhaps inspire, young and veteran writers alike who find themselves somewhere-anywhere-along their own roads to greater readership.

Sunday, April 12, 2:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Ellen Meeropol presents On Hurricane Island

As a major hurricane threatens the northeast, math professor Gandalf Cohen is abducted by federal agents and flown to a secret interrogation center off the coast of Maine. Austin Coombs, a young local resident, is a newly hired civilian guard assigned to the detention center. Henry Ames, a man of personal secrets, is the FBI special agent in charge of Gandalf's case and doubts the professor's terrorist involvement; Tobias, his second-in-command, disagrees, preferring violent interrogation. As the hurricane slams the shore, conflict detonates and each character must choose a side if they're to survive the storm.

Told over the five days approaching the anniversary of 9/11, by varying voices on both extremes of the political divide, On Hurricane Island is both a fast-paced political thriller and a literary examination of the sociopolitical storm facing our society. How far should government go in the name of protecting our national security? What happens when governmental powers of surveillance and extra-legal interrogation are expanded? How free are we?

A former nurse practitioner and part-time bookseller, Ellen Meeropol is the author of one previous novel, House Arrest. She lives and writes in Western Massachusetts.

Tuesday, April 14, 7:00pm - REPUBLIC at Calhoun Square 3001 Hennepin Ave South
Books & Bars discusses The Martian by Andy Weir

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there.

After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive—and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive.

Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plain-old "human error" are much more likely to kill him first.

But Mark isn't ready to give up yet. Drawing on his ingenuity, his engineering skills—and a relentless, dogged refusal to quit—he steadfastly confronts one seemingly insurmountable obstacle after the next. Will his resourcefulness be enough to overcome the impossible odds against him?

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Wednesday, April 15, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Chris Cander presents Whisper Hollow

One morning in Verra, a town nestled into the hillsides of West Virginia, the young Myrthen Bergmann is playing tug-of-war with her twin, when her sister is killed. Unable to accept her own guilt, Myrthen excludes herself from all forms of friendship and affection and begins a twisted, haunted life dedicated to God. Meanwhile, her neighbor Alta Krol longs to be an artist even as her days are taken up caring for her widowed father and siblings.

Everything changes when Myrthen marries the man Alta loves. Fourteen years later, we meet Lidia, a teenage girl in the same town, and her precocious son, Gabriel. When Gabriel starts telling eerily prescient stories that hint at Verra’s long-buried secrets, it’s not long before the townspeople begin to suspect that the boy harbors evil spirits—an irresistible state of affairs for Myrthen and her obsession with salvation.

Praise for Whisper Hollow:

“Like D. H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers, Chris Cander’s beautiful novel, Whisper Hollow, is about love that finds its object, and love that misses its mark and becomes destructive, in a community of coal miners. ... Chris Cander’s understanding of men and women is profound, and the scenes in this wonderful book will stay with you like a visionary experience.” —Charles Baxter, author of Gryphon: New and Selected Stories

“Love and loss, devotion and longing, hope and despair, Cander renders all of this and more through the lives of three women spanning more than fifty years. Here is a novel so full of life—of its beauty and cruelty—that I emerged from it like one of those men walking from mines she so wonderfully evokes, like a man walking from the darkness into the light.” —Peter Geye, author of The Lighthouse Road

Chris Cander is a novelist, children’s book author, freelance writer, and teacher for Houston-based Writers in the Schools. Her novel 11 Stories, published by a small press in Houston, was included in Kirkus’s best indie general fiction of 2013.

Thursday, April 16, 7:30pm - Hopkins Center for the Arts, 1111 Mainstreet, Hopkins, MN
Pen Pals with Jodi Picoult

In just over 20 years, Jodi Picoult has published 21 novels, including the #1 New York Times bestsellers The Storyteller, Lone Wolf, Sing You Home, House Rules, Handle with Care, Change of Heart, Nineteen Minutes and My Sister’s Keeper. With sales of more than 46 million books in 34 languages in 35 countries, several of her works have been made into films for both television and the big screen. Leaving Time (her 22nd novel) will be published in Fall 2014.

In a lecture entitled, “The Facts Behind the Fiction,” Ms. Picoult will explore the fascinating, and sometimes humorous, research she does for her novels.

Picoult will also be speaking on Friday, April 17, at 11:00am.

This event is part of the Pen Pals Author Lecture series, a ticketed series benefiting Friends of HCL. The 2014-2015 Pen Pals Season offers five award-winning and engaging presenters who collectively have written, critiqued or created thousands of books: Joyce Carol Oates (with Michael Dirda), Doris Kearns Goodwin, Richard Blanco, Jodi Picoult and Chip Kidd.

Learn more about Pen Pals and purchase a ticket here. Tickets are $40-$50.

Friday, April 17, 7:00pm - The Loft Literary Center | 1011 Washington Avenue South | Minneapolis, MN 55415

The Loft Literary Center presents Mentor Series Reading: Ru Freeman

The 2014–15 Loft Mentor Series in Poetry and Creative Prose presents fiction mentor Ru Freeman reading along with program participants Kate Lucas (poetry) and S.A. Wolter (fiction).

Ru Freeman was born into a family of writers and many boys in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Her creative work has appeared or is forthcoming in VQR, Guernica, World Literature Today, and elsewhere. She is a contributing editorial board member of the Asian American Literary Review, and a fellow of the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, Yaddo, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. She is the author of the novel A Disobedient Girl (Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2009), which was long-listed for the DCS Prize for South Asian Literature, and translated into several languages. Her new novel, On Sal Mal Lane, was published by Graywolf Press in 2013. She calls both Sri Lanka and America home and writes about the people and countries underneath her skin.

Kate Lucas works as a writer and educator in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her poems and essay writing have appeared in sleet magazine; rock, paper, scissors; Studio One; and the anthology From the Pews in the Back, and she received an Honorable Mention in the 2013 Loft Mentor Series for Poetry. She received her MFA from Hamline University and served as assistant poetry editor for Water~Stone Review in 2014.

S. A. Wolter spent her childhood on a cattle ranch and farm in northwestern North Dakota. Following career opportunities and paychecks, she has lived most of her adult life in the metropolitan areas of Phoenix, Arizona and Minneapolis/Saint Paul, Minnesota. She was a 2013 recipient of a Minnesota Artist Initiative Grant in prose. Her writing credits include the Jonis Agee Award for Fiction in Dust & Fire: Writing and Art by Women and publication in Open to Interpretation: Intimate Landscape, a juried book competition of photographs, poetry, and prose. She currently resides in Eden Prairie with her husband, two teenage children, and her writing companion, a small dog named Macy.

Tuesday, April 21, 6:15pm - The Happy Gnome (498 Selby Ave, St Paul, MN 55102)
Books & Bars discusses The Martian by Andy Weir

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there.

After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive—and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive.

Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plain-old "human error" are much more likely to kill him first.

But Mark isn't ready to give up yet. Drawing on his ingenuity, his engineering skills—and a relentless, dogged refusal to quit—he steadfastly confronts one seemingly insurmountable obstacle after the next. Will his resourcefulness be enough to overcome the impossible odds against him?

Books & Bars is an open public book club show. We provide a unique atmosphere for a lively discussion of interesting authors, fun people, good food and social lubrication (liquid courage), with moderator Jeff Kamin.

Friday, April 24, 7:00pm - Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Madelon Sprengnether reads from Great River Road: Memoir and Memory and Near Solstice: Prose Poems with poet Patricia Kirkpatrick

About Great River Road:

Great River Road is about the transformations of memory over time. Personal memory, as we now know, is fluid, flexible, malleable—blending current experience with remembered events, hence altering individual memories in the process of recall. Memoir writing, like memory, reconstructs the past in the light of the present. In this way, painful or even traumatic events ... may change over time in ways that open new avenues of insight and self-awareness. Both memoir and memory re-member the past in ways that offer the possibility of transformation.

“Great River Road is a candid personal story and a far larger one: an intriguing take on the challenge of revisiting our lives, taking pleasure in old joys, and overcoming our natural resistance to the painful parts. Sprengnether’s conclusion that memory is a ‘process rather than a product, a verb rather than a noun’ is the perfect way to open tight-shut doors to the forgiveness of others and of the self.” - Rosellen Brown

About Near Solstice: Prose Poems:

Near Solstice is grounded in the body and sensual awareness as the means by which we experience the world. In a series of interlinked poems, which read like meditations, this collection deals with the death of parents, family members and friends in the context of the passing of seasons, the vicissitudes of sexuality, the consolations of landscape, and the significance of light. With their focus on individual moments in time, which expand to include history, myth and culture, these poems are both profoundly physical and intensely spiritual.

“Madelon Sprengnether’s short prose poems surprise us with their quick turns and telegraphic insights, their physical bearing—what she calls ‘bodyworlds’—and spiritual poise. Near Solstice is a book of urgencies.” - Edward Hirsch

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Madelon Sprengnether is Regents Professor in the Department of English at the University of Minnesota, where she teaches literature and creative writing. In addition to scholarly books and articles, she has published a collection of lyric essays, Rivers, Stories, Houses, Dreams; a memoir, Crying at the Movies: A Film Memoir; two collections of poems, The Normal Heart and The Angel of Duluth; and a co-edited collection of travel writing by women, The House on Via Gombito.

Patricia Kirkpatrick received the inaugural Lindquist & Vennum Poetry Prize. Her book Odessa, selected by poet Peter Campion and published by Milkweed Editions in 2012, was awarded the 2013 Minnesota Book Award in Poetry. She is the author of Century’s Road, poetry chapbooks, and books for young readers. Her work appears widely in journals and in anthologies, including Robert Bly in This World and She Walks in Beauty.

Monday, April 27, 7:00pm - Minneapolis Central Library in Pohlad Hall (300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401)
Talk of the Stacks with Dan Buettner

A National Geographic Fellow and New York Times bestselling author, Dan Buettner is the founder of Blue Zones, a nonprofit dedicated to putting the world’s best practices in longevity and well-being to work in people’s lives. His research on longevity led to a National Geographic cover story, “Secrets of Living Longer,” and two national bestsellers, The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who’ve Lived the Longest and Thrive. A revered public speaker, he has appeared on CNN, the David Letterman Show, Good Morning America and the Today Show to discuss his groundbreaking research. His newest book, The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People, is filled with moving personal stories, recipes and useful tips for a healthier, happier life.

Talk of the Stacks is a reading series exploring contemporary literature and culture. Programs are free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served. Programs begin at 7 pm. Doors open at 6:15 pm. Books are available for sale and signing. Signings follow lectures.

Funding provided by National Endowment for the Arts. In-Kind sponsors: MinnPost and Magers and Quinn Booksellers.

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